Fangirl

Fangirl ~ Rainbow Rowell

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Rating 4.5 Stars

Blurb

In Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl, Cath is a Simon Snow fan. Okay, the whole world is a Simon Snow fan, but for Cath, being a fan is her life—and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, ensconced themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving.

Reading. Rereading. Hanging out in Simon Snow forums, writing Simon Snow fan fiction, dressing up like the characters for every movie premiere.

Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to.
Now that they’re going to college, Wren has told Cath she doesn’t want to be roommates. Cath is on her own, completely outside of her comfort zone. She’s got a surly roommate with a charming, always-around boyfriend, a fiction-writing professor who thinks fan fiction is the end of the civilized world, a handsome classmate who only wants to talk about words . . . And she can’t stop worrying about her dad, who’s loving and fragile and has never really been alone.

For Cath, the question is: Can she do this? Can she make it without Wren holding her hand? Is she ready to start living her own life? And does she even want to move on if it means leaving Simon Snow behind?

Review

yes i did read this 400+ page book in a day… and yes it was amazing.
this was my first Rowell book having not yet fallen for the craze that is Eleanor and Park and i must admit i had a bad feeling that i wouldn’t enjoy it, don’t ask me why because i have heard nothing but good things about it.
i loved the dynamic between Cath and Wren and i found that Rowell perfectly captured the first year experience. i may never have been nearly as much a part of a fandom as Cath was but i loved the perspective of a character that was a writer. while personally i was not all that fussed on the love interest it was still pulled off really well and i liked that he was not your average love interest you see so often in YA.
the exerts from Simon Snow were brilliant and defiantly reminiscent of Harry Potter but i am still working out if Baz is meant to be Ron, Malfoy or some combination of both (that is my guess)

Quotes

“In new situations, all the trickiest rules are the ones nobody bothers to explain to you. (And the ones you can’t Google.)”

“Happily ever after, or even just together ever after, is not cheesy,” Wren said. “It’s the noblest, like, the most courageous thing two people can shoot for.”

“Real life was something happening in her peripheral vision.”

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Rate That Cover: The One

So today’s rate that cover is the cover for the third and final book in the selection trilogy, The One. and here is the cover

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absolutely beautiful cover that matches the series perfectly. i called that it would be a white dress and i’m stunned by how beautiful it turned out. this is a series full of beautiful covers and i will not deny that the cover was the reason i first picked up the selection.

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but Kiera Cass was not finished there the cover for the selection stories was also released and is also quite beautiful and matches just enough to tie in to the rest of the series while differentiating itself from the main covers

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The Invention of Hugo Cabret

The Invention of Hugo Cabret ~ Brian Selznick

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Rating 4 Stars

Blurb

With 284 pictures between the book’s 533 pages, the book depends equally on its pictures as it does on the actual words. Selznick himself has described the book as “not exactly a novel, not quite a picture book, not really a graphic novel, or a flip book or a movie, but a combination of all these things.” The Caldecott Medal is for picture books, in 2008 this was first novel to receive.

The primary inspiration is the true story of turn-of-the-century French pioneer filmmaker Georges Méliès, his surviving films, and his collection of mechanical, wind-up figures called automata. Selznick decided to add automata to the storyline after reading Edison’s Eve by Gaby Wood, which tells the story of Edison’s attempt to create a talking wind-up doll.

Méliès actually had a set of automata, which were either sold or lost. At the end of his life Méliès was broke, even as his films were screening widely in the United States. He did work in a toy booth in a Paris railway station, hence the setting. Selznick drew Méliès’s real door in the book.

Review

I really enjoyed this book. the images gave it a movie like vibe (now making me really interested in the film) and I loved the combination of sketches and photo’s. the ending was incredibly clever and although it did not take me long to read it fully immersed me while I was there. plus it feels good to say I have read a 500+ page book in under 3 hours (shorter time than some movies). it is not the sort of story that would have captured my attention had it not been for the images (which make up half the book) but the images lifted it out of the expected story and turned it into an experience that is not quite reading a novel or a picture book and yet not quite watching a movie but was truly enchanting.

Quotes

“I like to imagine that the world is one big machine. You know, machines never have any extra parts. They have the exact number and type of parts they need. So I figure if the entire world is a big machine, I have to be here for some reason. And that means you have to be here for some reason, too.”

“ If you lose your purpose … it’s like you’re broken. ”

“Time can play all sorts of tricks on you. In the blink of an eye, babies appear in carriages, coffins disappear into the ground, wars are won and lost, and children transform, like butterflies, into adults.”

“If you’ve ever wondered where your dreams come from when you go to sleep at night, just look around. This is where they are made. ”

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